Reply To: Having trouble with beliefs/behaviors

#24994
AvatarPeter Bunyan
PSTEC User

Hi bj

Your subconscious is brilliant at coming up with excuses or reasons for not doing things, it is also brilliant at being creative and coming up with reasons why you should and how to do things. The difference is in the feelings, fears and emotions that block out the positive and something called Confirmation Bias. If you worry about the lack of money for your truck then the longer this position holds the more your subconscious says “see I told you so” and further confirms and strengthens your belief that you do not have and will not have the money.

Counter statements are similar to Positive statements and are Negatives turned around. Confirmation Bias ignores the fact that things and situations change, nothing stays the same forever. Positives are born out of hope for a better future. Softer statements progressing to more absolute positive statements build on that hope and make it a more solid belief and further into blind faith. With this you can move mountains.

You can logically construct a good business case for your truck but your subconscious does not understand logic it does not understand what a truck is, it is just a thing, it does however respond to the vehicle TV adverts which suggest you will be a real man with this truck or become a magnet for beautiful women with this sports car. (More likely a magnet for speed cops).

Think carefully about why you want the truck and what it represents emotionally. You can feel good about having it if it can enable you to haul more or be more efficient in miles per gallon. If you feel compelled by those TV ads then you might need to do some Click Tracking on other emotions. You don't need a truck you need the good feelings that come with it.

That “I'm pretty crummy when it comes to..” is a negative belief, an excuse for not being positive. If your mind can create negative excuses, it can also create positive reasons, the mechanism is the same just switched around.

I suspect that you believe you are pretty crummy at other things as well and possibly OK at some others. Use the OK things to suggest that you could be better at the not so good rather than letting the “crummy” feelings infect everything else.

If you were brought up in poor surroundings and when you asked your parents for something the other kids had and they may have replied with ” Am I made of money? Does it grow on trees? or some such, then if you can recall such or similar incidents then Click Track those first. The “lack of” feelings usually stem from childhood times.

Peter