Belief Phrase Variations

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  • #21821
    AvatarBrian Tucker
    PSTEC User

    Hey guys –

    I see different phrases being used in various sorts e.g.

    I'm not worthy
    I am not worthy
    I'm unworthy
    I am worthless

    I am not loved.
    I can't be loved
    I'm unloveable

    What is the best practice with respect to the exact phrase?
    Does it have to be a perfect match to erase the belief?
    Should the tool be run on variations to ensure it is completely cleared?

    Looking for your guidance here for.

    Thank you!

    #24688
    Paul McCabePaul McCabe
    PSTEC Pro and Forum Moderator

    Hi plus1g,

    Although each belief may be phrased differently, I would recommend that you say each of the variations out loud. Does any of the phrases have more resonance than the others?

    In most cases, each variation will hold the same emotional resonance, as each phrase will essentially be describing the same belief using different words or syntax.

    Sometimes the phrasing will seem to be important if it's something you've heard a lot of times before and has caused you emotional comfort. For instance, if someone was repeatedly told “you're worthless” and developed the belief “I'm worthless”, that phrase will likely pack a bigger emotional punch than “I don't have any worth.”

    However, the essence of the belief is what's pivotal. We hold the essence and the words are just what we use to convey that.

    I'd contend that, once you successfully eliminate “I'm worthless” (or the words that capture the essence of the belief), that would knock out the variations.

    You'll know this when you eliminate the belief and, in all probability, the variations will hold no resonance. There are some similar beliefs you can hold (“I'm not important” and “I'm worthless” would be seperate beliefs worth eliminating)

    The contractions wouldn't (would not!) impact the structure or essence of the belief. Best way to illustrate this would be to consider a belief you may already hold: do you see that there is no discernible difference between “I'm a hard-working person” and “I am a hard-working person”?


    Paul McCabe – PSTEC Master Practitioner

    http://www.lifestyleforchange.com

    Please contact me anytime if you want any assistance in utilising PSTEC to help you live a life of tremendous freedom & possibility.

    Recreate yourself with PSTEC.

    Skype, Zoom, in-person & phone sessions available…

    #24689
    Paul McCabePaul McCabe
    PSTEC Pro and Forum Moderator

    Meant to mention as well…

    Using your specific examples, “I'm not worthy” is actually a different essence to “I'm worthless.” They are separate beliefs.

    “I'm not worthy” is a self-esteem belief, most likely formed in early childhood. It would be held as though you are “not worthy” of something: love, success, respect etc.

    “I'm worthless” would be held as though you believe you have no inherent worth as a person.

    The difference is akin to the differences between “I'm not good enough” (usually related to feelings about your abilities or worth) and “I'm not a good person” (a belief that you're inherently bad)

    Just wanted to make that further distinction.

    Paul


    Paul McCabe – PSTEC Master Practitioner

    http://www.lifestyleforchange.com

    Please contact me anytime if you want any assistance in utilising PSTEC to help you live a life of tremendous freedom & possibility.

    Recreate yourself with PSTEC.

    Skype, Zoom, in-person & phone sessions available…

    #24690
    AvatarPeter Bunyan
    PSTEC User

    Hi plus1g

    As Pauls suggestion the one that has the most feeling as being right is probably the best one to use. PSTEC Generally short and simple works best , however for PSTEC Negative Tim suggests, if I remember correctly, 8-10 word sentences.

    If you find yourself using a phrase that you have used many times before in response to some situation (it has become a “saying”) then using the exact words will likely be best.

    If they feel like they have the same meaning to you then variations should not be needed. If you are not getting the results you want then it would not hurt to try.

    If you find that while running a track you correct the grammar or rewrite the sentence then it is probably not the right or that you have an analytical type mind and you are not focusing on the feeling behind the sentence.

    Peter

    #24691
    AvatarBrian Tucker
    PSTEC User

    Guys this is fantastic info – a wealth of info of which I attracted through my 30+ listenings of WoA. :)

    Interesting on the “worthless” topic. As I was reading through that, I remembered when I was a kid my dad used to greet me often as “Heeeeyyyyy worthless, how you doin” What's goin on worthless” or “What's happening worthless” with a big smile on his face.

    Your post immediately brought this image back to me and the sound of his voice crystal clear. Also phrases he used with respect to “lazy” as well. Mind you these were jokingly done but we know what the result is.

    So I would suspect as a good example – “I am worthless” and “I am lazy” would both be great negatives to remove.

    #24692
    AvatarPeter Bunyan
    PSTEC User

    Hi plus1

    Also try looking for other possibly unrelated coincidental minor events at the time your Father said such things, that confirmed the words he said to you were true. Even though his joking and smile gave you the impression that he was just joking. Normally the body language is correct and the words meaningless but the contradiction between the two can be confusing for a child. So if something else happened to you that made the words seem correct then maybe you came to believe his words.

    I wish I knew how words held such power when my kids were young. I would have been more careful about how I said things to them. Your body language says what you feel louder than your words.

    Peter

    #24693
    Paul McCabePaul McCabe
    PSTEC Pro and Forum Moderator

    Brilliant, Peter.

    From what I have learned and personally experienced, you can form numerous beliefs and conditionings from the same type of events. Once we form the beliefs, they then form part of our perceptual filters – “I'll see it when I believe it.” I'd add “I'll feel it when it's conditioned” to that description.

    What's important in our everyday interactions is always our intention, I believe, and even though we may not say the “right thing”, our kids will *usually* pick up the intention. That's what I believe anyway, but I do encounter issues with my own kids where I say or do something, and they've misinterpreted it.

    Ultimately, events happen (or we do/say things) and we have no active control with how they are interpreted. The best we can do is explain what our intentions were; what I love about PSTEC is that it gives us an amazing tool to change the interpretation and take the “charge” out of the memory.

    I'm using PSTEC on myself slightly differently than “prescribed” in some cases, and I'll share more about that soon..It's not a case of me ignoring the instructions or trying to reinvent the wheel, but using it for a different purpose.

    With regard to the sort of beliefs you have identified, plus1g, Peter's advice to go back and really study the experiences that led to the formation of the belief. Try to see it through the eyes or feel it from the perspective of the child you were when you formed the beliefs.

    Be your own detective.

    There's a great technique to help “prime the pump” in a logical fashion. You can do this by asking the following questions:

    Who? What? When? Where?

    This can be done for each and every belief.

    For example, if you're countering the belief “I'm lazy”, the questions could help you come up with these alternatives:

    – (Who?) “My dad said I was lazy, but he was wrong.” or “My dad joked that I was lazy, but he was just trying to motivate me. Someone joking doesn't mean that's what they believe.”

    – (What?) “Maybe Dad thought I was lazy when I didn't work as hard as he wanted, but he just had unrealistic expectations.”

    – (When?) “Maybe I was lazy when I was a child, but that doesn't mean I'd always be lazy or that I'm a lazy person.”

    – (Where?) “Maybe I was lazy at home, but that was because I wasn't motivated there or at that time, or by those sort of comments.”

    Each interpretation will enable you to see that “I'm lazy” is just something you made up and attached to your dad's comments and the subsequent feelings that arose from those.


    Paul McCabe – PSTEC Master Practitioner

    http://www.lifestyleforchange.com

    Please contact me anytime if you want any assistance in utilising PSTEC to help you live a life of tremendous freedom & possibility.

    Recreate yourself with PSTEC.

    Skype, Zoom, in-person & phone sessions available…

    #24694
    AvatarPeter Bunyan
    PSTEC User

    Absolutely Paul

    Going further into this area we would have to look at the “Mind Model” and how it is formed and shapes us. This can challenge how we think about who we are and what is reality, perhaps a bit too much for this thread.

    Can't wait to find out about your new uses for PSTEC.

    Peter

    #24695
    AvatarSally Baker
    PSTEC User

    When I'm working with a client using PSTEC negative belief buster we spend some time creating the symantics/phrase and words to describe the negative belief. We might end up with a list of similar sentences. I use EFT with my client for them to consider each phrase and score it zero to ten with the highest score correlating to greatest reasonance. Taking a little time at this stage to really intuitively get in touch with each set up. We work of course on the negative belief with the highest score and on checking back the lesser score phrases no longer resonate either. Job done.

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